Newsletter

Just Projects Inc.

REFRAMING RELUCTANCE

By: Diane Wadham, Director, Corporate Relations

Corporate volunteerism is very much part of the business landscape for businesses of all sizes. Businesses both small and large recognize that being socially responsible is a necessary component to a healthy and thriving business culture.

For those businesses that are in the process of engaging in a volunteer project that requires the participation of the employees, the challenge is not often in the buy-in of this important business component from the employees; rather the reluctance on the part of the employer to request a commitment of personal time from the staff that a volunteer initiative would require. This is a very natural and legitimate concern.† The good news is this concern does not have to be an obstacle to a small business launching a volunteer effort.

The opportunities presented by participating in corporate volunteerism come in many forms. While the recipient of the volunteerism is the obvious beneficiary, the benefits to the company that launched the initiative range from improved corporate visibility and reputation to profiling your corporate values.† The benefits to the employees should also be factored when considering a commitment to volunteerism.

A good starting point is to bear in mind that the majority of people believe in volunteerism*. Those that give of themselves are rewarded with a sense of well-being from helping others that lasts far beyond the volunteer event itself. This knowledge should allow the initial feeling of reluctance of requesting employees to participate in a business volunteer initiative to be reframed as providing an important opportunity for the employees.

 

Reframing reluctance into opportunity is more than just a shift in thinking. It is a clear vision as to what the volunteer opportunity will yield. Opportunity presents benefits. Understanding the benefits to the employees is essential to presenting the corporate volunteerism in the right frame.

Employee engagement is integral to the success and viability of any business.† What better way to enhance this important relationship than by providing an opportunity for the employees to branch out and participate in a corporate related event that has such positive implications.† Depending on the nature and structure of the volunteerism, employees can be presented with a variety of benefits: the chance to enhance their overall work environment, the ability to broaden existing skill sets and reveal new ones, stronger sense of community and strengthened commitment to giving back.

Perhaps one of the most critical and positive elements to offering corporate volunteerism to employees is it clearly demonstrates a commitment on the part of the employer to the employees. This commitment can boost staff morale and loyalty.

Such an outcome makes it worth reframing any sense of reluctance with an enthusiastic approach to including employees in what will likely be a rewarding experience of personal growth and development for them.

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*See http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-008-x/2012001/article/11638-eng.htm

 

 

THOUGHT FOR THE MONTH:

 

We canít help everyone, but everyone can help someone.

-Ronald Reagan

CONTACT INFO:

For more information regarding this newsletter, please contact:

Diane Wadham, Director, Corporate Relations

Diane.wadham@justprojects.ca

 

Please note this newsletter is by Just Projects, copyright 2015.† Content was written by Diane Wadham.† Any Just Projects newsletter may be copied to your heartís content as long as you kindly ask us first via email.